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Web Links

Welcome to the Our World Grade 2 Web Links page!

Here are the links that are referred to in the Grade 2 Teaching Resource. Page references are to the Teaching Resource.

 

Page vii, Francophone Education

For more on Francophone education in Alberta, view the "Affirming Francophone Education: Foundations and Directions" document at the Alberta Education site.

Page 10, The Four Inuit Regions

For maps and information about the four Inuit regions in Canada, visit the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami site. The Inuit regions are Nunavik, Nunavut, Inuvialuit, and Labrador. The Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami is an organization that represents the interests of Inuit across Canada.

Page 12, Regina, Iqaluit, and Bouctouche

You can learn about Regina at the official City of Regina site. Click on "Welcome to Regina" to read about its history, attractions, and symbols, and to see a map.

Learn about Iqaluit at the official City of Iqaluit site. Click on "Tourists" and then "About Iqaluit" to learn about the city's history and demographics, and to see maps.

Learn about Bouctouche at the official Town of Bouctouche site. Use the menu to find information about the town's history, culture, attractions, and to see a map.

Page 12, École Dr-Marguerite-Michaud

To see a study of Bouctouche through the eyes of its Grade 2 residents, visit the École Dr-Marguerite-Michaud site. Click on "Projets des élèves" and then "Project Rescol, Ma communauté." The site is in French, but you can still gather information from the photos. Click on "Nos apprentissages" to see photos of the students.

Page 20, Map Tool

For an online map tool, go to the MapQuest site.

Page 20, Photos of Regina, Iqaluit, and Bouctouche

For photos of Regina, visit the official City of Regina site. Click on "Send an online postcard" to see a variety of images. Also, click on "Welcome to Regina" and then "Attractions" to see more images.

For photos of Nunavut, visit the official Government of Nunavut site. Click on "Photo Album."

For photos of Iqaluit, go to the Iqaluit WorldWeb Travel Guide. WorldWeb is a travel directory.

For photos of Bouctouche, go to the official Town of Bouctouche site. Click on "Attractions" and pick an attraction from the menu.

For a photo of La Dune de Bouctouche, go to the Irving Eco-Centre site.

For photos of New Brunswick, go to the official tourism site of the Government of New Brunswick.

Pages 24 and 25, Weather Reports

You can get past, present, and predicted weather reports from the Environment Canada site. Click on a province or territory to see a list of towns and cities. Then click on a town or city to see its weather reports.

Go to the Weather Network site for current weather reports and forecasts for Canadian locations. You can also type in any date within the past five years to learn what the weather was like that day.

Page 39, Daily Life in the Three Communities

To learn about daily life in a school in Iqaluit, go to the Aqsarniit Ilinniarvik site.

To follow the daily life of an Inuk child in the Inuit region of Nunavik in Quebec, go to the Ulluriaq School site.

Go to Kids' Stop at the Indian and Northern Affairs site to learn more about Aboriginal peoples in Canada. In the menu on the left, click on "What's New" to find games and information sheets. Click on "Through Mala's Eyes" for an activity about life in an Inuit community.

To find Acadian recipes, go to the Acadian Cultural Society site, and click on "Culture."

To view and learn more about William Kurelek's paintings, go to Artcyclopedia and click on the name of each art gallery or museum.

Page 40, Inuit Stories

For a story about a 12-year-old Inuk boy, go to Kids' Stop at the Indian and Northern Affairs site. In the menu on the left, click on "What's New" then "Through Mala's Eyes." Lesson plans accompany this fictitious story.

Page 50, Aboriginal Languages

For a comprehensive site on Aboriginal languages, go to the Native Languages of Americas site. This not-for-profit organization promotes the survival of Aboriginal languages. The site includes a master list of Native American languages, and a vocabulary list.

To hear everyday phrases spoken in Inuktitut, go to Kids' Stop at the Indian and Northern Affairs Canada site. In the menu on the left, click on "Languages" then "Inuktitut."

Go to the Office of the Languages Commissioner of Nunavut for information on the languages spoken in Nunavut. Click on "Learning Inuktitut" to find a downloadable chart of Inuktitut symbols, and a Web link to "Inuktitut for Travellers," which includes audio files.

Page 51, Inuktitut for Travellers

To hear everyday phrases spoken in Inuktitut, go to Kids' Stop at the Indian and Northern Affairs Canada site. In the menu on the left, click on "Languages" then "Inuktitut."

Page 51, The Mi'kmaq Language

For an audio pronunciation guide of the Mi'kmaq language, go to Atlantic Canada's First Nation Help Desk. This site has audio files for Mi'kmaq songs and talking posters. There are even lessons teaching common phrases.

For names of animals in Mi'kmaq, go to the Mi'kmaq Language Centre of Excellence site. You can use the pronunciation guide at the Atlantic Canada's First Nation Help Desk site to learn how to pronounce these words.

For audio files of some Mi'kmaq phrases, go to the First Nations on SchoolNet site. This is part of the Government of Canada site.

Page 52, Translations for Hello

For translations of "hello" into many different languages, go to The Internet Public Library: KidSpace. Click on a language to find the translation and pronunciation. This site is operated by the University of Michigan.

Find more translations for "hello" on PlanetPals. This site provides educational tools to teach children about the Earth's natural resources and ecological issues.

Page 55, Inuksuit

For more information on inuksuit, go to the Canadian Museum of Civilization site. Click on the icon at the bottom right of the opening screen, then click on "The Photographs" to find explanations of the various types of inuksuit.

Page 58, Provincial Flags

To see Canada's provincial and territorial flags, go to the ImageSoft site, and click on "Canadian Flags" then "Provincial Flag Images."

Page 63, Storytelling: The Art of Knowledge

For Mi'kmaq, Métis-Cree, and Inuvialuit stories, go to Storytelling: The Art of Knowledge on the Canadian Museum of Civilization site.

Page 64, List of Events in Regina, Bouctouche, and Iqaluit

To learn more about celebrations in Bouctouche, go to the Town of Bouctouche site, and click on Culture. Select "Festival des Mollusques," and "Fête nationale des Acadiens." Select "Tjipogtotjg" and follow the links to learn more about the Tjipogtotjg powwow.

To learn about events in Regina, go to About.com's Canada for Visitors site.

To learn more about Francophone celebrations in Saskatchewan, go to Le site internet fransaskois, and click on "Activities." This is part of the Canada's Digital Collections site.

To learn about celebrations in Iqaluit, go to the City of Iqaluit site and click on "Residents," then "What's Happening," then "Events." You will find a month-by-month listing of events.

Page 67, History

For a view of Mi'kmaq society from the 1500s to present day, go to the Mi'kmaq Portrait Collection at the Nova Scotia Museum site.

For a pictorial view of Acadia, past and present, go to the Acadian Gallery on the Canada's Digital Collections site.

Historical sketches of Saskatchewan and other parts of Canada may be found at the Picture Gallery of Canadian History, Volume II: 1763 to 1830, including Red River carts, travellers' luggage, and York boats.

For more information on Regina's history, visit the Saskschools.ca site.

For more information on the Plains Cree, visit the Canada Heirloom Series on the Canada's Digital Collections site.

For more on Inuit history, go to the 5000 Year History section of the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami site. The Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami is an organization that represents the interests of Inuit across Canada.

For more information on the history of Bouctouche and Acadian history, visit the History section of the Town of Bouctouche site.

For helpful information sheets on Acadian history and way of life, go to the Nova Scotia Museum Web site.

Page 70, Alberta Acadian Society

To learn more about the history of Acadians, go to the Alberta Acadian Society site. Read "What is an Acadian?" and click on "the rest of the story."

Page 80, Industries and Economies

Go to the following sites to learn about the industries and economy of Regina, Iqaluit, and Bouctouche:

View the document called Regina: Profile of Our Capital City on the City of Regina site.

Read the Nunavut Fact Sheets on the Government of Nunavut site.

View the "CED Background Report" in the Community Economic Development section of the City of Iqaluit site.

Read the Economic Profile on the Town of Bouctouche site.

Page 83, Inuit Art and Cultural Objects

For photos of Inuit art and cultural objects, go to the Iqqaipaa: Celebrating Inuit Art, 1948-1970 exhibit at the Canadian Museum of Civilization site. Click on "Exhibition" then "Highlights from the Exhibition" to see Inuit sculptures and prints. Click on "Cultural Objects" to see Inuit tools. Click on "Art Making" to see how some artwork is made.

Page 108, Background Information

Alberta's History

For photos and a list of events in Alberta's history, go to the Timeline on Alberta's Heritage Community Foundation site. Click on a photo to bring up information on the event. Click on an arrow to move to another historical era.

For segments on Alberta's history, go to Home, Home on the Plains on Alberta's Heritage Community Foundation site. The history is presented in 7 phases. After you have clicked on a phase, click on a topic listed in the menu on the left.

AlbertaSource is a collection of Web sites compiled by Alberta's Heritage Community Foundation. It is a source for facts, stories, and images about Alberta's past, present, and future. Click on the "Search Sites" menu bar and make a selection to find links to various topics in Alberta's history.

For a virtual tour of Alberta's legislative building, go to Tour Alberta's Legislature on the Legislative Assembly of Alberta site.

Aboriginal Peoples in Alberta

For a list of First Nations and reserves in Alberta, go to the Aboriginal Canada Portal and click on "First Nations" in the menu on the left. The Aboriginal Canada Portal has links to national Aboriginal organizations, and to federal and provincial government departments that have Aboriginal responsibilities. The site also has listings for Aboriginal communities and businesses. This site is part of the Government of Canada site.

For profiles of First Nations in Alberta, go to the First Peoples on SchoolNet site. This is part of the Industry Canada site.

For historical information on Aboriginal peoples in Alberta, go to Alberta: How the West Was Young on Alberta's Heritage Community Foundation site. Click on "First Nations & Métis" to find various readings and a glossary. There is also an audio component to this site.

The Kids Pages on the First Peoples on SchoolNet site has links to sites on languages and stories. It also has links to sites for Aboriginal schools.

Métis in Alberta

For a list of Métis communities in Alberta, go to the Aboriginal Canada Portal and click on "Métis" in the menu on the left. The Aboriginal Canada Portal has links to national Aboriginal organizations, and federal and provincial government departments that have Aboriginal responsibilities. The site also has listings for Aboriginal communities and businesses. This site is part of the Government of Canada site.

To learn about the history of Alberta's Métis, go to the Alberta Métis Historical Society site. This site includes a video called Proud to be Métis. The Alberta Métis Historical Society was formed in 1986 out of the need to provide training opportunities for Métis people, and to educate Canadians about the role of Métis in Canada. This site is part of the Government of Canada site.

Francophones in Alberta

To learn about the history of Francophones in Alberta, visit St. Vincent and St. Paul: Memory in Francophone Alberta on the Canada's Digital Collections site. This is part of the Government of Canada site.

Go to Les Rendez-vous de la Francophonie site to learn about the history, culture, and demographics of Francophone communities in Alberta.

To learn about Francophone settlement in Alberta, go to Alberta Settlement: The French Canadians on Alberta's Heritage Community Foundation site. This site includes audio files.

For statistics on Alberta's Francophone population and information on programs, go to the Canadian Heritage site. This is a Government of Canada site.

Page 110, Alberta's Special Places

For photos and information about Alberta's six bio-regions, go to Alberta's Special Places and click on "Alberta's 6 regions." This site was created by Ray Rasmussen, a photographer in Alberta.

Page 125, Homesteading

To learn more about homesteading, go to Alberta Rural Life: Farming and Homesteading on Alberta's Heritage Community Foundation site.

For an historical account of homesteaders in Alberta, go to Reminiscences of the Heathcote Family, 1894-1901 on the Library and Archives Canada site. To read the typewritten document, click on "Larger image" then click on a thumbnail of each page.

Page 134, Calgary's Heritage Park

For a virtual tour of Heritage Park in Calgary, go to this interactive map. Click on various spots on the map to see photos of the park. Heritage Park recreates life in Alberta before 1914.

Page 140, Big Things

To see photos and descriptions of Alberta's more inventive and fun monuments, go to the Big Things: The Monuments of Canada site and click on "Big Things by Province" then "Alberta."

Page 144, Métis Symbol

To learn more about the infinity symbol on the Métis flag, go to the Métis Culture and Heritage Resource Centre site.

Page 144, Father Lacombe and the St. Albert Mission

To learn more about Father Lacombe and the St. Albert mission, go to St. Albert on Alberta's Heritage Community Foundation site, and to the Great Names of the French Canadian Community site.

Page 144, Population Statistics

For population statistics, go to the Statistics Canada site. Type in a place name to find its population in 1996 and 2001 (the census years). Note that usually two statistics are given for each town or city: one statistic includes suburbs or communities just outside the town or city (the metropolitan area), while the other statistic does not. When comparing population statistics, you need to decide whether or not to compare metropolitan areas.

For categorized population statistics, go to the Population and Demography section of the Statistics Canada site.

 

Page 145, First Nations in Alberta

The Turtle Island Network provides links to various Aboriginal organizations. This site is an Aboriginal news and information network based in British Columbia.

For information on Native friendship centres in Alberta, go to the Alberta Native Friendship Centre Association site. Click on "Alberta Friendship Centres" then click on a community on the map to learn about the history and the objectives of a particular friendship centre.

The Athabasca Tribal Council site has information about the five First Nations within its region (northeastern Alberta).

The North Peace Tribal Council site has information about the five First Nations within its region (north-central Alberta). Click on "Enter" then "First Nations Profile."

The Aboriginal Multi-Media Society site has links to Aboriginal news sources such as Windspeaker and Alberta Sweetgrass.

Page 145, Francophones in Alberta

To learn about an organization that represents Franco-Albertans today, go to L'Association canadienne-française de l'Alberta site.

For statistics on Alberta's Francophone population and information on programs, go to the Canadian Heritage site. This is a Government of Canada site.

Go to Les Rendez-vous de la Francophonie site to learn about Francophone communities in Alberta.

Go to the Francophonie jeunesse de l'Alberta site to learn about an organization that represents French-speaking youth in Alberta (ages 14 to 25).

 

Page 145, Francophone Centres in Alberta

You can contact the Fédération des parents francophones de l'Alberta to ask for maps showing Francophone centres in Alberta and Francophone schools in Alberta.

 

Page 146, St. Vincent and St. Paul

To learn about the history of Francophones in Alberta, visit St. Vincent and St. Paul: Memory in Francophone Alberta on the Canada's Digital Collections site. This is part of the Government of Canada site.

Page 151, Volunteers in Canada

Learn about the Alberta Great Kids Award on the Alberta Children's Services site. Click on "2005 Great Kids Awards Recipients," in the menu on the left, to read about the children who won this award in 2005.

Go to the Volunteer Wall of Fame on the Alberta Community Development site and click on "Stars of the Millennium Volunteer Awards Program." Then click on "Award Recipients from 2004" to read about the winners.

Go to the Volunteer Canada site to read personal stories about volunteers.

 

 

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