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Nelson Education > School > Mathematics K-8 > Mathematics 4 > Teacher Centre > Web Quest > Chapter 5
 

Web Quest

Chapter 5

WHICH IS THE LONGEST OF THEM ALL?

THE TASK

This Web Quest provides students with an opportunity to use a variety of length units and show how they are related. It also acts as a review of graphing techniques used in Chapter 3. This Web Quest can be done individually or in pairs.

Students will use several websites to find the length of 1 animal from each of the following groups: mammal, amphibian and reptile, bird, fish, and insect. They must find 1 example that is measured in millimetres, 1 in centimetres, 1 in decimetres, 1 in metres and 1 in multiple units. They will graph this data, using the graphing method of their choice.   Using their graph students must answer the question, which animal is the longest of them all? Students will also write 2 other questions that their graphs answer.

GOALS

•  use a variety of length units and show how they are related
•  compare 5 animals of a variety of lengths
•  collect and organize data
•  construct a graph to display data

MEETING INDIVIDUAL NEEDS

•  Students may find it challenging to find a scale for their graph. Be sure that they are looking at the lengths of the animals using a common unit of measurement.

INSTRUCTIONAL PROCESS

  1. Have students read the Introduction and Task sections of the Web Quest. Ask students to give you examples of animals belonging to the 5 animal groups. Ask them to consider what length units they think they would use for each of the groups.   Have students explain their thinking.
  2. The following websites are some of the many sites that provide information on animals.

    Seaworld
    The Canadian Museum of Nature
    The Toronto Metro Zoo
    Hinterland Who's Who

    Lengths are not provided for each animal so encourage students to scan the texts quickly instead of reading the entire thing in search of this information. As you circulate, point out that even though the length of an animal may be written using one unit of measurement, students may record lengths using the unit of measurement of their choice. Students can record data on the The Animal Group Factsheet.
  3. Once they have finished collecting their data, students may begin constructing their graphs. If needed, do a quick review of graphing techniques.   While students are working, observe/interview students to see how they are carrying out the task. Ensure that they are able to choose an appropriate scale for their graph.
  4. Once they have completed their graphs, have them answer the question, "Which is the longest of their 5 animals?" and write 2 more questions that their graphs answer.
  5. As a task wrap-up, have students compare their findings with each other. For example, who chose the longest/shortest mammal in the class?

RESOURCES

Websites:

Seaworld
The Canadian Museum of Nature
The Toronto Metro Zoo
Hinterland Who's Who

Materials:

graphing software and computer (optional)
grid paper
pencil crayons
ruler

Files:

The Animal Group Fact Sheet

ASSESSMENT

 

 

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

Understanding of Concepts

•  Demonstrates a superficial understanding of how to: read/interpret data from a graph and has difficulty drawing conclusions; use a variety of lengths and show how they are related.

•  Demonstrates a partial understanding of how to: read/interpret data from a graph and draw simple conclusions; use a variety of lengths and show how they are related.

•  Demonstrates an appropriate understanding of how to: read/interpret data from a graph and draw simple conclusions; use a variety of lengths and show how they are related.

•  Demonstrates an in-depth understanding of how to: read/interpret data from a graph and draw conclusions; use a variety of lengths and show how they are related.

Application of graphing Procedures

- Selecting Procedures

- Applying Procedures

•  selects an inappropriate scale to graph data

•  makes major errors and/or omissions when constructing a graph

•  selects a partially appropriate scale to graph data

•  makes several errors and/or omissions when a graph

•  selects an appropriate scale to graph data

•  makes minor errors and/or omissions when constructing a graph

•  selects the most efficient scale to graph data

•  makes no errors and/or omissions when constructing a graph

Communication

Use of Mathematical Conventions>

 

 

•  few graphing conventions are used correctly

•  some graphing conventions are used correctly

•  most graphing conventions are used correctly

•  almost all graphing conventions are used correctly

 

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