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Nelson Education > School > Mathematics K-8 > Mathematics 4 > Teacher Centre > Web Quest > Chapter 4
 

Web Quest

Chapter 4

WHERE DO NEW CANADIANS COME FROM?

TASK CONTEXT

This activity complements the Chapter 4 Chapter Task (Student Book, p120) by providing students information about immigrants who come to live in Canadian cities. Data from Statistics Canada have been used to create charts that provide immigrant population by place of birth for 15 Canadian cities. Students are asked to use this information to write a newspaper article telling readers about Canadian immigration. Because of the complexity of the immigration charts at the Statistics Canada Web site, data that is suitable for this grade level has been extracted and placed in a simpler chart. Students can reach these charts by clicking on the links.

GOALS

  • Add and subtract with 4-digit numbers.
  • Create and solve addition and subtraction problems.

MEETING INDIVIDUAL NEEDS

  • The size of the immigrant population varies from city to city and so the charts contain numbers that are less than 4-digits and more than 4-digits. The teacher might ask a student to write about a particular city, based on this. For example, less able students might use data from St. John's because the populations are smaller.
  • Students who require a challenge can log on to the Statistics Canada website and use data from larger urban areas, such as Toronto. They can check their addition and subtraction using a calculator.
  • Once students have gathered their data, pair stronger writers with those who will need some assistance.
  • Some students might be able to better compare the numbers if they put them into graph form first.

INSTRUCTIONAL SEQUENCE

  1. Discuss the meaning of immigration and emigration as well as the fact that many people not only move from one house to another but from one country to another. Ask students if their family emigrated to Canada and, using a globe or an atlas, find some of these countries.
  2. Read the Introduction and the Task with the students. Discuss the type of information they might include in their newspaper article. Discuss reasons why an author would combine some of the information and would not want to simply print the chart.
  3. Place the students in pairs to summarize the information from the charts using the Immigration Worksheet .

Key questions to ask while students work:

"What do all the numbers in the chart have in common? Why do you think all the numbers end in 5 or 0?"

"If you want to tell your readers that there are more people from ____ than from _______, would you add or subtract the numbers?"

"For which numbers might you use a calculator to add or subtract? Why?"

"Which cities do you think might have the largest total populations? How can you tell?"

"Windsor and Sudbury have about the same population. Is their immigration the same? Do more Americans move to Windsor or to Sudbury? How many more?"

RESOURCES

Websites:

Immigrant Population: Statistics Canada Data

Files:

Immigration Worksheet

Materials:

Atlas
Calculator

ASSESSMENT

 

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

Problem Solving

Make a Plan

•    Shows little or no evidence of a plan to determine immigration trends.

•  Shows evidence of a partial plan to determine immigration trends.

•  Shows evidence of an appropriate plan to determine immigration trends.

•  Shows evidence of a thorough plan to determine immigration trends.

Application of Procedures:

Addition and Subtraction

•    Makes major errors and/or omissions when adding and subtracting up to 4-digit numbers.

•  Makes several errors and/or omissions when adding and subtracting up to 4-digit numbers.

•  Makes only a few minor errors and/or omissions when adding and subtracting up to 4-digit numbers.

•  Makes almost no errors when adding and subtracting up to 4-digit numbers.

Communication

•  Provides incomplete or inaccurate explanations.

•  Uses minimal math words, numbers and diagrams.

•  Provides partial explanations.

•  Uses simple words, numbers and diagrams.

•  Provides complete, clear and logical explanations.

•  Uses appropriate math words, numbers and diagrams.

•  Provides thorough, complete and insightful explanations.

•  Uses a range of math words, numbers and diagrams.

 

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