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Nelson Education > School > Mathematics K-8 > Math Focus > Grade 6 > Parent Centre > Web Quests > Chapter 5
 

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Chapter 5 - Motion Geometry

Design a Quilt

INTRODUCTION

Quilts can be made with simple or complicated designs. Quilts are often made by sewing together many square blocks (square pieces of fabric) to make one large blanket. Each square block can be made with different combinations of shapes and colours.

 

THE TASK

Imagine that you would like to make a quilt for your bed. The quilt will have eight blocks and you need to design what each block will look like. You can use between one to three different shapes inside each square block. In each design you must to transform the shapes by translating, reflecting, and/or rotating them.

 

THE PROCESS

  1. Visit Block Party to view examples of quilt block designs. You may base your blocks on the designs shown, or create new designs.
  2. Visit Patch Tool and choose the shapes to use for your design.

    Click and drag a shape to the white area to begin. Translate, reflect, and/or rotate shapes to make a design.

    To rotate a shape, click the polygon with the circular arrow overtop (beneath the eraser button), then click the shape you want to rotate. 

    To reflect a shape across a horizontal line, click the polygon with the red horizontal arrow (beneath the rotate button), then click the shape you want to reflect.

    You may make the blocks as big or small as you wish. You may also leave as much white space within the block as you would like.

  3.  
  4. Copy your design onto grid paper using coloured pencils to fill in the shapes.
  5. Number each block from one to eight. Starting with the first block, describe how you created each design.

 

RESOURCES

Websites:

Block Party

Patch Tool

 

Materials:

pencil
ruler
coloured pencils
grid paper

 

ASSESSMENT

Mathematical Processes Work meets standard of excellence Work meets standard of proficiency Work meets acceptable standard Work does not yet meet acceptable standard
Communication provides a precise and insightful explanation of each transformation provides a clear and logical explanation of each transformation

provides a partially clear explanation of each transformation

provides a vague and/or inaccurate explanation of each transformation

  uses effective and specific mathematical language, symbols, and conventions to enhance communication uses appropriate and correct mathematical language, symbols, and conventions to support communication uses mathematical language, symbols, and conventions to partially support communication uses mathematical and nonmathematical language and conventions incorrectly and/or inconsistently which interfere with communication
Connections

makes insightful connections between at least two mathematical concepts

makes meaningful connections between at least two mathematical concepts makes simple connections between at least two mathematical concepts
makes minimal or weak connections between at least two mathematical concepts
Visualization
uses visual representations insightfully to foster/demonstrate a thorough understanding uses visual representations meaningfully to foster/demonstrate a reasonable understanding uses visual representations simply to foster/demonstrate a basic understanding uses visual representations poorly to foster/demonstrate an incomplete understanding

 

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