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Nelson Education > School > Mathematics K-8 > Math Focus > Grade 4 > Teacher Centre > Web Quests > Chapter 4
 

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Chapter 4 - Planning a Playground

INTRODUCTION

Playgrounds are not only made up of simple swings and slides anymore. A playground for children is an important place where children develop physical strength and balance as well as make new friends. There are many companies who sell playground equipment and most of this equipment is very expensive. These companies show many of their products on their websites. When a group of people design a new playground, they should find out what equipment is available and then ask the people who will use the playground as well as what type of equipment they would like.

 

THE TASK

Your class has been asked to plan a new playground for the Kindergarten and Grade 1-3 students in your school. The school will buy three new pieces of equipment (one large adventure play structure, one free-standing slide, and one swing set). Your task will be to create and administer a survey about possible playground equipment. Use the results of the survey to make a graph and a written recommendation to your principal about which equipment the school should buy.

 

THE PROCESS

  1. Investigate the websites that sell playground equipment. For example, you could look at Henderson Recreation Equipment, Columbia Cascade, Blue Imp Play Ideas or Play Power
  1. As you find equipment that you like, save the pictures (images) so that you can include these in your survey.
  • Choose three of each type of play equipment. If you choose too many for your survey, people will find the survey too hard to complete.
  • Save up to three pictures of each type of your favourite pieces of equipment.
  • Create a file called "Playground Equipment". Ask your teacher where you should create this file (perhaps in My Pictures ).
  • Place the cursor over the picture and right-click.
    Click Save picture As
  • Click on the file in which you will place the picture.
  • Name the picture (e.g. 'slide1', 'structure1', or 'swing2'). Click Save.
  1. Create a survey using the pictures you have saved. Make sure that the survey says that they can choose one play structure, one slide and one swing to have in the playground.
  • Write a survey question.
  • Write instructions for people to complete the survey. For example, do you want them to circle the equipment they want or place a checkmark in the boxes?
  • Place the name of the equipment and the pictures in the boxes.
  • Click inside the box where you want to insert the picture.
  • At the top of your screen, click Insert .
  • Click Picture and then From File in the drop-down box.
  • When your files come on the screen, click on the picture file you want to place in the box and click Insert.
  • Re-size the picture to fit the survey box.
  • You may need to format the picture to move it into your survey.
  • Right click on the picture, select format picture, then choose behind text.
  1. Ask at least 10 people to complete your survey.
  2. Make a tally of your results.
  3. Then create one bar graph to show each type of equipment preference. You should create three graphs altogether.
  4. Write a letter to the principal explaining why this equipment should be purchased.

 

RESOURCES

Websites:

Henderson Recreation Equipment
Columbia Cascade
Blue Imp Play Ideas
Play Power

Files: My Playground Equipment Survey

 

 

ASSESSMENT

  Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4
Communication The student created a survey question that was not clear to the reader. The student created a survey question that was not quite clear. It gave him/her some results he/she could graph. The student created a good survey question that resulted in clear data. The student created an excellent and clearly stated the survey question that resulted in clear data.

Understanding of Concepts

The student had difficulty reading the graph.

The student needed help to make a recommendation to the principal.

The student was able to read and interpret some of the data from a graph and made one recommendation to the principal.

 

The student could read and interpret data from a graph and made a recommendation to the principal. The student could read and interpret data from a graph and made several excellent recommendations to the principal.

Application of Graphing Procedures

-Selecting procedures

-Applying procedures

The student had difficulty selecting a scale for his/her graph or did not use a scale.
The student made major errors and/or omissions in his/her tally chart and graph.

 

The student selected a scale for my graph that caused some problems.

 The student made several errors and/or omissions in his/her tally chart and graph.

The student selected an appropriate scale for his/her graph.
 The student made minor errors and/or omissions in his/her tally charts and graphs.
The student selected the best scale for his/her graph.
The student made no errors and/or omissions in his/her tally charts and graphs.
Use of Mathematical Conventions

The student only used a few graphing conventions correctly (e.g. titles, axes, labels, intervals, datapoints).

 

The student used some graphing conventions correctly.
The student used most graphing conventions correctly.
The student used almost all graphing conventions correctly.

Teacher Comments:

 

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