Nelson
Math Focus 4
Student Centre
• Surf for More Math
• Try It Out
• Web Quests
Teacher Centre
Parent Centre

Nelson Education > School > Mathematics K-8 > Math Focus > Grade 4 > Student Centre > Web Quests > Chapter 2
 

Surf For More Math

Chapter 1: Patterns in Mathematics

How Many Valentines?

INTRODUCTION

Many people think of mathematics as the study of number patterns. Recognizing number patterns is also an important problem-solving skill. Often you can look at many specific examples and discover a broader pattern. Then, you can use that pattern to find a solution to a problem.

 

THE TASK

Your class is exchanging Valentine’s Day cards. You want to find out how many cards are being exchanged by your classmates. Can you discover a number pattern to help you solve this problem?

 

THE PROCESS

  1. Let’s practice solving this problem. Go to the Patterns in Math website and follow the prompts. It will show you a variety of strategies you can use to solve this problem.
  2. Be sure that you explore all of the strategies you can use when working through this problem by clicking on each strategy link.
  3. You can then see the answers and solutions that other students wrote down. Make sure that you also post your answer. Write your reasoning for your solution and justify your answer.
  4. You are now ready to solve this problem for your class. How many Valentine’s would be passed out in your classroom?
    • Write the problem on piece of paper.
    •  Solve the problem using at least two of the strategies from the practice problem on the website.
    •  Justify your solution and explain your thinking.

 

RESOURCES

Websites:

Patterns in Math

Materials:

paper and pencil

 

ASSESSMENT

  Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4
Problem Solving (Make a Plan) The student did not have   a plan to help him/her solve the problem. The student had a partial plan to help him/her solve the problem. The student had an appropriate plan to help him/her solve the problem. The student had a thorough plan to help him/her solve the problem.
Application of Procedures (Solving the Problem) The student made major errors and/or omissions when solving the Valentine problem. The student made several errors and/or omissions when solving the Valentine problem. The student made almost no errors and/or omissions when solving the Valentine problem. The student made no errors when solving the Valentine problem.
Communication The student's explanations were incomplete or inaccurate.
The student used very few math words, numbers and diagrams.
The student gave partial explanations.
The student used simple words, numbers and diagrams.
The student gave complete, clear and logical explanations.
The student used appropriate math words, numbers and diagrams.
The student gave thorough, complete and insightful explanations.
The student used a range of math words, numbers and diagrams.

 

Top