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Nelson Education > School > Mathematics K-8 > Math Focus > Grade 3 > Student Centre > Web Quests > Chapter 11
 

Web Quests

Chapter 11: 2-D and 3-D Geometry

Design a Dog House

INTRODUCTION

A dog house should be like any other house. It should be strong and stable. A dog house should have a flat base and walls that are sturdy.

 

THE TASK

Imagine that your family just got a new puppy. You have been asked to design a dog house for the puppy. There are several shapes for you to choose from to design the dog house.

 

THE PROCESS

  1. Visit Three Dimensional Shapes to see the 3-D shapes you have to choose from. Select 2 shapes that fit what you need for the dog house:
    • The shape must have a flat face for the bottom of the dog house.
    • The shape must have at least 4 vertices.
  2. Describe the number and shape of the faces of each of your objects.
  3. How many vertices and edges do your objects have?
  4. Do your 3-D objects fit the description in question 1? Explain.
  5. Build a skeleton of each structure.
  6. Which of the two 3-D objects you selected will you choose for your design of the dog house? Why?

 

RESOURCES

Website:

Three Dimensional Shapes

Materials:
pencil
paper
modelling clay
straws, toothpicks, bamboo skewers, or pipe cleaners

 

ASSESSMENT

Mathematical Processes

Work meets standard of excellence

Work meets standard of proficiency

Work meets acceptable standard

Work does not yet meet acceptable standard

Connections

• demonstrates a sophisticated ability to transfer knowledge and skills to new contexts

• demonstrates a consistent ability to transfer knowledge and skills to new contexts

• demonstrates some ability to transfer knowledge and skills to new contexts

• demonstrates a limited ability to transfer knowledge and skills to new contexts

Visualization

• uses visual representations insightfully to foster/demonstrate a thorough understanding

• uses visual representations meaningfully to foster/demonstrate a reasonable understanding

• uses visual representations simply to foster/demonstrate a

basic understanding

• uses visual representations poorly to foster/demonstrate an incomplete understanding

Communication

• uses effective and specific mathematical language, symbols, and conventions to enhance communication

 

• provides a precise and insightful explanation of

mathematical concepts

and/or procedures

• uses appropriate and correct mathematical language, symbols, and conventions to support communication

 

• provides a clear and logical explanation of mathematical concepts and/or procedures

• uses mathematical language, symbols, and conventions to partially support communication

 

• provides a partially clear explanation of mathematical concepts and/or procedures

• uses mathematical and nonmathematical language and conventions incorrectly and/or inconsistently that interfere with communication

• provides a vague and/or inaccurate explanation of mathematical concepts and/or procedures

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