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Nelson Education > School > Mathematics K-8 > Math Focus > Grade 3 > Parent Centre > Web Quests > Chapter 7
 

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Chapter 7: Fractions
Planning a Vegetable Garden

INTRODUCTION

When you are trying to grow a garden, insects can be big problem — some of them eat your plants! If you are trying to grow food for you to eat, these insects (or pests) become an even bigger problem. Luckily, you can plant certain plants together to help keep away pests. This can help when you are planning a garden.

 

THE TASK

Imagine that you are planting a vegetable garden in the shape of a square. You want to plant four different types of vegetables. Two of the vegetables will be tomatoes and carrots. You would like the other vegetables you plant to keep pests out of the garden. Make a plan for your garden where 2/6 of the garden is for carrots, 2/6 of the garden is for tomatoes, 1/6 of the garden is for one other vegetable, and 1/6 is for the other vegetable.

 

THE PROCESS

  1. Visit Gardening for Your Health and scroll down to the “Health for your garden” section to find out what 2 other vegetables you should plant beside carrots and tomatoes to help keep pests out of your garden.
  2. Use Fraction Pieces to design your garden. Click “Squares” at the top of the screen and “Show Labels” at the bottom. Then click on the yellow rectangles to add pieces to the window. Drag the pieces onto the square to divide it into 6 pieces. Choose a colour for each vegetable. To change the colour of a rectangle, click on the rectangle and then one of the colours shown at the bottom of the screen. Remember to place the vegetables that keep pests away beside the vegetables that the insects might eat.
  3. Draw your design on paper and colour and label each vegetable in the garden. Include the fraction for each part.
  4. How do the fractions tell you what vegetables you will have more of to eat?
  5. How could you change your design if you wanted to grow carrots in 3/6 of your garden? Use Fraction Pieces to make a model of your new design. Then draw the design on paper, including labels and fractions. (Remember, you have to keep the pests off your other plants too!)
  6. Use the fractions to compare the parts of your garden design from step 5.

RESOURCES

Websites:

Gardening for Your Health

Fraction Pieces

Materials:

pencil

pencil crayons

grid paper

 

ASSESSMENT

Mathematical Processes

Work meets standard of excellence

Work meets standard of proficiency

Work meets acceptable standard

Work does not yet meet acceptable standard

Communication

• uses effective and specific mathematical language, symbols, and conventions to enhance communication about fractions

 

 

• organizes and displays results in effective and clear ways that enhance interpretation

• uses appropriate and correct mathematical language, symbols, and conventions to support communication about fractions

 

 

• organizes and displays results in appropriate and reasonably clear ways that assist interpretation

• uses mathematical language, symbols, and conventions to partially support communication about fractions

 

 

 

• organizes and displays results in somewhat appropriate and partially clear ways that make inferring necessary by the reader

• uses mathematical and nonmathematical language and conventions incorrectly and/or inconsistently which interfere with communication about fractions

 

• organizes and displays results in haphazard and/or unclear ways that impede interpretation

Connections

• makes insightful connections between real-world contexts and mathematical ideas

 

 

• makes meaningful connections between real-world contexts and mathematical ideas

• makes simple connections between real-world contexts and mathematical ideas

• makes minimal or weak connections between real-world contexts and mathematical ideas

Visualization

• uses visual representations insightfully to foster/demonstrate a thorough understanding of fractions

• uses visual representations meaningfully to foster/demonstrate a reasonable understanding of fractions

• uses visual representations simply to foster/demonstrate a basic understanding of fractions

• uses visual representations poorly to foster/demonstrate an incomplete understanding of fractions

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