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Nelson Education > School > Mathematics K-8 > Math Focus > Grade 3 > Parent Centre > Web Quests > Chapter 1
 

Chapter 1: Patterns in Mathematics

Olympic Training

INTRODUCTION

Olympic athletes train very hard for many years before they go to the Olympics. On average, Olympic athletes spend 8 h training each day. They usually spend some time training indoors (for example, running, stretching, weight lighting), and some time training outdoors (for example, skiing or snowboarding).

 

THE TASK

You must create a training schedule for an Olympic athlete and use increasing patterns to figure out the number of hours of training.

 

THE PROCESS

  1. Visit the web site for the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Games to see a list of Winter Olympic sports. Choose a sport that you would like to train for.
  2. Decide on a number of hours that you need to train each day. The number of hours should be between 6 h and 10 h.
  3. Decide on a number of hours you will train indoors, and a number of hours that you will train outdoors. They should add up to your total number of hours from Step 2.
  4. Use an increasing pattern to figure out the total number of hours you would train indoors over 1 week (7 days).
  5. Use another increasing pattern to figure out the total number of hours you would train outdoors over 1 week (7 days).
  6. Write a rule for each increasing pattern.
  7. Suppose you wanted to increase the number of hours that you train each week by 2 h every week until the Olympics. Write an increasing pattern to show how many hours of training you would be doing each week after 6 weeks.

 

RESOURCES

Websites:

Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic Sports

Materials:

pencil
paper

calendar (optional) 

 

ASSESSMENT

Mathematical Processes

Work meets standard of excellence

Work meets standard of proficiency

Work meets acceptable standard

Work does not yet meet acceptable standard

Problem Solving

Your child demonstrates an insightful understanding of the problem

Your child chooses an efficient and effective strategy to use a pattern to plan a training schedule

 

 

Your child demonstrates a complete understanding of the problem

Your child chooses an appropriate and workable strategy to use a pattern to plan a training schedule

 

Your child demonstrates a basic understanding of the problem

Your child chooses a simplistic and/or routine strategy to use a pattern to plan a training schedule

 

Your child demonstrates a limited understanding of the problem

Your child chooses an inappropriate or unworkable strategy to use a pattern to plan a training schedule

 

Communication

Your child provides a precise and insightful explanation of the pattern rules

 

Your child uses effective and specific mathematical language, symbols, and conventions to tell about the pattern

 

Your child provides a clear and logical explanation of the pattern rule

 

Your child uses appropriate and correct mathematical language, symbols, and conventions to tell about the pattern

 

Your child provides a partially clear explanation of the pattern rule

 

Your child uses mathematical language, symbols, and conventions to tell about the pattern

 

Your child provides a vague and/or inaccurate explanation of the pattern rule

 

Your child uses mathematical and non-mathematical language and conventions incorrectly and/or inconsistently to tell about the pattern

 

 

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