Nelson Higher Education

Higher Education

The New Harbrace Guide: Genres for Composing (with 2019 APA Updates), 3rd Edition

  • Cheryl Glenn
  • ISBN-10: 1305956788
  • ISBN-13: 9781305956780
  • 512 Pages | Paperback
  • Previous Editions: 2012, 2009, 2009
  • COPYRIGHT: 2018 Published
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Overview

About the Product

THE NEW HARBRACE GUIDE: GENRES FOR COMPOSING offers a sleek and dynamic, rhetorically-based writing guide that includes a guide to genres and persuasion, thematic reader, and research manual (offering both MLA and APA style guides). It also provides additional coverage of punctuation, grammar, and style. THE NEW HARBRACE GUIDE brings the rhetorical situation to life, whether on the screen, on the page, in an academic setting or at work, at home, and in the community, especially with its emphasis on knowledge transfer. Renowned author and educator Cheryl Glenn translates rhetorical theory into easy-to-follow (and easy-to-teach) techniques that help sharpen students' rhetorical abilities; their digital, print, and multimodal composing skills; and the critical reading and thinking skills that promote intellectual confidence.

Features

  • The most thorough rhetorical writing guide on the market, THE NEW HARBRACE GUIDE addresses theory, composing and reading practices, genre composition, research activities, and grammar through the constant lens of rhetorical awareness and analysis.

  • Each of eight common genres -- memoir, profile, investigative report, position argument, proposal, evaluation, critical analysis, and literary analysis -- is covered in its own chapter. Each genre chapter includes a micro example, an annotated example, a step-by-step writing guide, and a variety of activities in different mediums and contexts to help students understand how to use rhetorical strategies in specific kinds of situations.

  • An emphasis on multimodal composition (print, digital, verbal, visual) includes a complete chapter with information on how to design multimedia texts that persuade and on rhetorical approaches to YouTube videos, oral presentations, and other common types of multimedia assignments. In each genre chapter, links to online samples and in-text activities called "Identifying an Opportunity for Change," "Writing in Three Media," and "Additional Assignments: Knowledge Transfer" reflect a growing consensus that multimedia is an important part of a writer's toolkit.

  • Annotated examples of student and professional writing in every genre give students the opportunity to understand how rhetorical elements interact, how rhetorical effects are created, and how essays and other compositions are structured.

  • Part 4, "A Guide to Research," takes a rhetorical approach rather than insisting on a particular sequence of procedures for doing research. Students learn to see research assignments as an effective way of responding to certain rhetorical opportunities. Because different research questions require different research methods, the research guide includes information on library, online, and field research. "Tricks of the Trade" features throughout the section target specific problem areas and effective solutions. MLA and APA documentation styles are included in separate chapters for ease of use.

Reviews

"I like the student friendly language and step-by-step guidance."
— Tyler Farrell, Marquette University

About the Author

Cheryl Glenn

Distinguished Professor of English and Women's Studies and Director of the Program in Writing and Rhetoric at The Pennsylvania State University, Cheryl Glenn is widely known for her scholarship, leadership, and teaching. Besides authoring THE HARBRACE GUIDE TO WRITING and co-authoring THE HARBRACE HANDBOOKS, she is author of the prize-winning RHETORIC RETOLD: REGENDERING THE TRADITION FROM ANTIQUITY THROUGH THE RENAISSANCE; UNSPOKEN: A RHETORIC OF SILENCE; RHETORICAL EDUCATION IN AMERICA; LANDMARK ESSSAYS ON RHETORIC AND FEMINISM; RHETORIC AND WRITING IN THE NEW CENTURY; and several other titles. Dr. Glenn's rhetorical scholarship has earned her many awards, including three National Endowment for the Humanities awards, the Conference on College Composition and Communication's Richard Braddock Award, Rhetoric Review's Outstanding Essay Award, Best Book/Honorable Mention from the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women, and Rhetorician of the Year. She has served as Chair of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC), the largest organization of writing and rhetoric teachers in the world; as President of the Coalition of Women Scholars in the History of Rhetoric and Composition; on the CCCC and NCTE Executive Committees; as Chair of the Modern Language Association (MLA) Division on the History and Theory of Rhetoric and Composition; and as a member of the MLA Delegate Assembly. Dr. Glenn's teaching and scholarship have earned her six university teaching and mentoring awards.

Table of Contents

Preface
PART I: ENTERING THE CONVERSATION: THE RHETORICAL SITUATION.
1. Understanding the Rhetorical Situation.
Rhetoric Surrounds Us. Finding an Opportunity for Change. The Decision to Engage. “The Force Awakens”. Analyzing the Elements of the Rhetorical Situation. Thinking Rhetorically About Purpose and Audience. Thinking Rhetorically About Genre and Media. Assignment: Rhetorical Opportunities. Michael Bérubé, "Life as We Know It".
2. Responding to the Rhetorical Situation.
Thinking Rhetorically About Persuasion. A Problem-Solving Approach. Making Claims. Using the Available Means of Persuasion. Malala Yousafzai, Blog Entries [I Am Afraid], [Interrupted Sleep]. Sojourner Truth, "Ain't I a Woman". The Amethyst Initiative, “It’s Time to Rethink the Drinking Age”. Resources and Constraints. Assignment: A Rhetorical Analysis.
3. The Writer as Reader.
Reading Strategies. Barry M. Prizant, "Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism [Animated Movies and Summary]". Summary. Critical Response. Analysis and Synthesis.
Jordynn Jack, Autism and Gender: From Refrigerator Mothers to Computer Geeks ["Savants" and "Geniuses"]. Assignment: The Synthesis (or Research) Essay.
4. Rhetorical Success in a Digital World.
Thinking Rhetorically About Multimedia Texts. Callout Card for Family Violence Prevention. Designing Multimedia Texts to Persuade. Pink Ribbon Website (annotated). Santa Fe Travel Website. How Images Tell a Story. Infographics. War Resisters League, "Where Your Income Tax Money Really Goes" (infographic). Considering Audience, Purpose, and Accessibility in Multimedia Compositions. NOAA, “Protecting Our Planet Begins with You”. The Brazos Gumbo Facebook Page. ViziGoGo Webpage. Caladenia Addams, YouTube: Bad Questions to Ask a Transsexual. Grace Randolph, YouTube: Concussion Movie Review. Carmine Gallo, Five Basic Elements in Every Steve Jobs Presentation. Assignment: Analyzing Images. Nike "Test Your Faith Daily" (advertisement).
PART II: WRITING PROJECTS: RHETORICAL SITUATIONS FOR COMPOSING.
5. Memoirs.
Genre in Focus: The Food Memoir. Reading Rhetorically. Key Features of a Memoir. Anna Seitz, “Herb's Chicken” (annotated). Using Synthesis and Analysis. Responding to the Rhetorical Situation. Understanding the Rhetorical Situation. Writing a Persuasive Memoir: A Guide. Advantages and Limitations of a Memoir. Revision and Peer Review. Additional Assignments: Knowledge Transfer. Grammar in Context: Thinking Rhetorically about Verb Tense.
6. Profiles.
Genre in Focus: The Bio. Reading Rhetorically. Key Features of a Profile. Sandra Sobieraj Westfall et al., "Heroes on the Train: 'It Was Either Do Something or Die'" (annotated). Using Synthesis and Analysis. Responding to the Rhetorical Situation. Understanding the Rhetorical Situation. Writing a Persuasive Profile: A Guide. Advantages and Limitations of a Profile. Revision and Peer Review. Additional Assignments: Knowledge Transfer. Grammar in Context: Thinking Rhetorically about Inclusive Language.
7. Investigative Reports.
Genre in Focus: The Explainer Report. Reading Rhetorically. Key Features of an Investigative Report. Christina Rosen, “The Myth of Multitasking” (annotated). Using Synthesis and Analysis.
Responding to the Rhetorical Situation. Understanding the Rhetorical Situation. Writing a Persuasive Investigative Report: A Guide. Advantages and Limitations of an Investigative Report. Revision and Peer Review. Additional Assignments: Knowledge Transfer. Grammar in Context: Thinking Rhetorically about Attributive Tags.
8. Position Arguments.
Genre in Focus: The Commentary.
Reading Rhetorically.
Key Features of a Position Argument.
Alicia Williams, “The Ethos of American Sign Language” (annotated).
Using Synthesis and Analysis.
Responding to the Rhetorical Situation. Understanding the Rhetorical Situation.
Writing a Persuasive Position Argument: A Guide.
Advantages and Limitations of a Position Argument.
Revision and Peer Review.
Additional Assignments: Knowledge Transfer.
Grammar in Context: Thinking Rhetorically about Coherence—Word Choice, Repetition, and Sentence Structure.
9. Proposals.
Genre in Focus: The Public Service Announcement. Reading Rhetorically. Key Features of a Proposal. Simon Arias, “Raise Pennsylvania’s Minimum Wage” (annotated). Using Synthesis and Analysis. Responding to the Rhetorical Situation. Understanding the Rhetorical Situation.
Writing a Persuasive Proposal: A Guide. Advantages and Limitations of a Position Argument.
Revision and Peer Review. Additional Assignments: Knowledge Transfer. Grammar in Context: Thinking Rhetorically about Linking Ideas.
10. Evaluations.
Genre in Focus: The Film Review. Reading Rhetorically. Key Features of an Evaluation. Alexis Walker, “Donuts at Easton's Center Circle: Slam Dunk or Cycle of Deterioration?” (annotated).
Using Synthesis and Analysis. Responding to the Rhetorical Situation. Understanding the Rhetorical Situation. Writing a Persuasive Evaluation: A Guide. Advantages and Limitations of an Evaluation. Revision and Peer Review. Additional Assignments: Knowledge Transfer. Grammar in Context: Thinking Rhetorically about Adjectives and Adverbs.
11. Critical Analyses.
Genre in Focus: Culural Analysis. Reading Rhetorically. Key Features of a Critical Analysis. Anna Seitz, “The Real-Time Consequences of an Online Degree” (annotated). Using Synthesis and Analysis. Responding to the Rhetorical Situation. Understanding the Rhetorical Situation.
Writing a Persuasive Critical Analysis: A Guide. Advantages and Limitations of a Critical Analysis. Revision and Peer Review. Additional Assignments: Knowledge Transfer. Grammar in Context: Thinking Rhetorically about Precise Language.
12. Literary Analyses.
Genre in Focus: Slam Poetry. Reading Rhetorically. Key Features of a Literary Analysis.
Marianne Moore, “Poetry”. Ralph Rees, “The Reality of Imagination in the Poetry of Marianne Moore” (annotated). Using Synthesis and Analysis. Responding to the Rhetorical Situation.
Understanding the Rhetorical Situation. Writing a Persuasive Literary Analysis: A Guide. Advantages & Limitations of a Literary Analysis. Revision and Peer Review. Additional Assignments: Knowledge Transfer. Grammar in Context: Thinking Rhetorically about Ellipsis Points in Quotations.
PART III: PROCESSES AND STRATEGIES FOR COMPOSING.
13. From Tentative Idea to Finished Project.
Planning a Response. Drafting a Response. Revising a Response. Peer Evaluation. Editing and Proofreading a Response. Designing the Final Draft. Anastasia Simkanin, “Technology and the Learning Process: One Student's View”.
14. Rhetorical Methods of Development.
Narration. Description. Exemplification. Definition. Classification and Division. Comparison and Contrast. Cause-and-Effect Analysis. Process Analysis. Argument.
PART IV: A GUIDE TO RESEARCH.
15. Thinking Rhetorically about Research.
Richard A. Lovitt, “Clues to Compulsive Collecting”. Considering the Rhetorical Situation.
Identifying the Research Question. Locating an Audience. Establishing your Purpose. Using a Research Log.
16. Identifying Sources.
Jeremy Berlin, “Pop Cultures”. Sources for Research.Fieldwork. Gillian Petrie, Interview of Jan Frese. Preparing a Working Bibliography.
Chapter 17 Evaluating Sources.
Responding to Your Sources. Questioning Sources. Preparing an Annotated Bibliography.
18. Synthesizing Sources: Summary, Paraphrase, and Quotation.
Avoiding Plagiarism. Summarizing Sources. William Lutz, “Doubts about Doublespeak”.
Sample Student Summary: Jacob Thomas, “Summary of 'Doubts about Doublespeak’”.
Paraphrasing Sources. Quoting Sources.
19. Acknowledging Sources in MLA Style.
MLA Guidelines for In-Text Citations. MLA Guidelines for Documenting Works Cited.
Sample MLA Research Paper: Greg Coles, “Slang Rebels”.
20. Acknowledging Sources in APA Style.
APA Guidelines for In-Text Citations. APA Guidelines for Documenting References. Sample APA Research Paper: Catherine L. Davis, “Perceptions of Peers' Drinking Behavior”.
PART V: REAL SITUATIONS FOR REAL WRITING: A THEMATIC READER.
21. Food and the (Cultural) Experience of Taste.
Margaret Mead, “The Changing Significance of Food [Overnourished and Undernourished in America]”.
Michael Pollan, “Out of the Kitchen, Onto the Couch [The Collapse of Home Cooking]”.
Karen Hernandez, “Why We Should Ditch the Slow Food Movement [A Response to Michael Pollan]”.
Corby Kummer, “Good-bye, Cryovac [Local Food, College Food Service, and Scraping Your Own Plate]”.
Alberto Mingardi, “Embrace the Food Tech That Makes Us Healthier—‘Locavores’ and Other Sustainability Advocates Oppose the Innovations That Extend and Improve Life”. Community Connections.
22. The Millennial Generation.
Joel Stein, “Millennials: The Me, Me, Me Generation”. Joel Landau, “VIDEO: Filmmaker Apologizes on Behalf of Entire Millennial Generation: ‘We Suck and We're Sorry’". Pew Research Center, “Most Millennials Resist the ‘Millennial’ Label”. David Fallarme, “A Look at How Gen Y Communicates”. Tom McBride, Ron Nief, and Charles Westerberg, “Beloit Mindset List 2019”. Community Connections.
23. Taking Up (Public) Space.
Pierre Christin and Olivier Balez, “Robert Moses: The Master Builder of New York City [The Battle with Jane Jacobs]” (graphic novel). Anthony Flint, Who Really Owns Public Spaces?. Abby Phillip, “Oklahoma Ten Commandments Statue Must Be Removed, State Supreme Court Says”. Emily Badger, “How Smart Phones Are Turning Our Public Places into Private Ones”. Jamie Utt, “From ManSpreading to ManSplaining—Six Ways Men Dominate the Space around Them”. Community Connections.
24. Whose Lives Matter?.
Todd S. Purdum, “Whose Lives Matter?”. Roxane Gay, “A Tale of Two Profiles”.
Malcolm-Aime Musoni, “Being an 18-Year-Old Black Man a Year after Mike Brown”.
Carimah Townes, “Obama Explains the Problem with ‘All Lives Matter’".
William J. Wilson, “The Other Side of Black Lives Matter”. Community Connections.
25. STEM vs. STEAM.
Melissa Davey, “Neil deGrasse Tyson Calls Scientific Illiteracy a Tragedy of Our Times”.
Terence Monmaney, “How Much Do Americans Know About Science?”. Anne Jolly, “STEM vs. STEAM: Do the Arts Belong?”. Nora Caplan-Bricker, “New Evidence: There is No Science-Education Crisis”. Marguerite Del Giudice, “Why It's Crucial to Get More Women into Science”.
Community Connections.
PART VI: A RHETORICAL GUIDE TO GRAMMAR AND SENTENCE STYLE [ONLINE].
Appendix 1: Essay Exams and the Rhetorical Situation [Online].
Appendix 2: Oral Presentations and the Rhetorical Situation [Online].
Appendix 3: Portfolios and the Rhetorical Situation [Online].

New to this edition

  • NEW: A streamlined introduction to rhetoric in Chapters 1 and 2 includes multiple multimodal texts to help students apply their theoretical knowledge immediately to contemporary examples from a wide range of contexts. Chapter 4 focuses specifically on "Rhetorical Success in a Digital World."
  • NEW: Chapter 3, "The Writer as Reader," prepares students, who often don't read much nonfiction, for their composition and other college courses. It reviews crucial active reading strategies, teaches students to read rhetorically, and introduces critical distinctions between summary, critical response, analysis, and synthesis, all of which aid students in responding more specifically and appropriately to writing assignments across the curriculum.
  • NEW: A "Genre in Focus" feature at the beginning of each genre chapter illustrates key features of the genre using a micro example for quick understanding.
  • NEW: Step-by-step guides to reading rhetorically and composing persuasively in each genre suggest concrete actions students can take in each stage of thinking and composing, demystifying how to apply rhetorical principles during the composing process.
  • NEW: Color-coding in instruction and sample student essays helps students understand the structure of a given genre by distinguishing the introduction, body, and conclusion and their rhetorical effects.
  • NEW: Knowledge transfer activities in "Additional Assignments" include assignments to help students transfer knowledge to other college courses and to community and workplace contexts.
  • NEW: A thematic reader offers diverse perspectives on five issues, two of which are entirely new to the third edition and all of which are collected in a new Part 5. The three popular themes retained from the second edition are "The (Cultural) Taste of Food" (Chapter 21), "The Millennial Generation" (Chapter 22), and "Taking Up (Public) Space" (Chapter 23). New themes that reviewers embraced are on race in "Whose Lives Matter?" (Chapter 24) and science in "STEM vs. STEAM" (Chapter 25).
  • NEW: A "Grammar in Context" feature at the end of each genre chapter looks at a specific grammar or usage topic that often arises when composing in that genre. This grammatical coverage in the book is reinforced in the handbook chapters of the MindTap® digital learning solution that supports the text.
  • NEW: MindTap® English engages students to become better thinkers and writers by blending your course materials with content that supports every aspect of the writing process. Resources include interactive activities on grammar and mechanics; a paper management system allowing for electronic submission, grading, and peer review while tracking potential plagiarism; a database of scholarly sources with video tutorials and examples to support the research process; and professional tutoring. Visual analytics track student progress with seamless integration into your learning management system.
  • NEW: Enhanced MindTap® annotations throughout the text identify opportunities for integrating digital resources into your class.
  • NEW: MLA guidelines in Chapter 19 reflect updates in the 2016 MLA Handbook, 8th Edition, which dramatically simplifies the MLA documentation style to focus on common types of elements in citing diverse sources.

Supplements

All supplements have been updated in coordination with the Main title.
Please see Main title page for new to this edition information.

Instructor Supplements

Online Instructor's Manual  (ISBN-10: 1305959205 | ISBN-13: 9781305959200)

This detailed manual provides sample syllabi, course guidelines, in-class exercises, and chapter objectives to assist instructors in teaching the course.

MindTap English, 1 term (6 months) Instant Access for Glenn's The New Harbrace Guide: Genres for Composing  (ISBN-10: 1305959159 | ISBN-13: 9781305959156)

MindTap English, 1 term (6 months) Instant Access for Glenn's The New Harbrace Guide: Genres for Composing, 3rd Edition is the digital learning solution that helps instructors engage and transform today's students into critical thinkers. Through paths of dynamic assignments and applications that you can personalize, real-time course analytics, and an accessible reader, MindTap helps you turn cookie-cutter into cutting-edge, apathy into engagement, and memorizers into higher-level thinkers. As an instructor using MindTap, you have at your fingertips the right content and unique set of tools curated specifically for your course, all in an interface designed to improve workflow and save time when planning lessons and course structure. The control to build and personalize your course is all yours, focusing on the most relevant material while also lowering costs for your students. Stay connected and informed in your course through real-time student tracking that provides the opportunity to adjust the course as needed based on analytics of interactivity in the course.

Student Supplements

MindTap English, 1 term (6 months) Instant Access for Glenn's The New Harbrace Guide: Genres for Composing  (ISBN-10: 1305959159 | ISBN-13: 9781305959156)

It’s 1 AM, there are 20 tabs open on your computer, you lost your flashcards for the test, and you’re so tired you can’t even read. It’d be nice if someone came up with a more efficient way of studying. Luckily, someone did. With a single login for MindTap English, 1 term (6 months) Instant Access for Glenn's The New Harbrace Guide: Genres for Composing, 3rd Edition you can connect with your instructor, organize coursework, and have access to a range of study tools, including e-book and apps all in one place! Manage your time and workload without the hassle of heavy books! The MindTap Reader keeps all your notes together, lets you print the material, and will even read text out loud. Need extra practice? Find pre-populated flashcards and the entire eBook in the MindTap Mobile App, as well as quizzes and important course alerts. Want to know where you stand? Use the Progress app to track your performance in relation to other students.