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Elementary Social Studies Home

Nelson Education > School Elementary Social Studies > Alberta Social StudiesOur Alberta > Teacher Centre > Web Links

 

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Teacher_Centre

Chapter Links

Chapter 1: Alberta's Beginning
Chapter 2: The Rocky Mountain Region
Chapter 3: The Foothills Region
Chapter 4: The Grassland Region
Chapter 5: The Parkland Region
Chapter 6: The Boreal Forest Region
Chapter 7: The Canadian Sheild Region
Chapter 8: The First Peoples
Chapter 9: The Fur Trade
Chapter 10: Early Settlement
Chapter 11: From Territory to Province
Chapter 12: Growth and Change
Chapter 13: Today and Tomorrow
Appendices

CHAPTER 1: ALBERTA'S BEGINNINGS

Lesson 1.2

View the Devil's Coulee Heritage Museum website for background on the area and read about paleontologist Kevin Aulenback's surprising discovery.

Lesson 1.3 and Lesson 1.6

The link to the Royal Tyrrell Museum provides details about programs and events at the museum.

Other related sites

The Parks Canada website has an extensive collection of visuals of national parks and national historic sites, including landscapes, buildings, artifacts, and people.

This link to the sitemap for the Alberta Heritage website provides an overview of the archeology and geology of Alberta, including glaciations.

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CHAPTER 2: THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION

Lesson 2.3

The Alberta Government Energy site has information about Coal, Mining, and Coal bed methane.

Lesson 2.4

Visit Canada's National Parks website for information about the parks and the origin of the national parks system.

Lesson 2.5

The Alberta Heritage Online Encyclopedia has a page describing species at risk in Alberta.

Lesson 2.6

For background on Alberta place names, see the Friends of Alberta website and the site for Natural Resources Canada.

Other related sites

On this link, you can view information about geography and endangered species in Albert, see photos of the Rocky Mountain region, and access links to Banff and Jasper National Parks and the Willmore Wilderness Park.

Parks Canada features websites for Banff National Park, Jasper National Park, and Waterton Lakes National Park.On each site there is historical and visitor information, information about natural wonders and cultural treasures, climate and geology, ecosystems, plants and animals, activities, learning experiences, and public safety.

Parks Canada also has websites for regional historic sites. View in particular the websites for Banff Park Museum National Historic Site and the Cave and Basin National Historic Site. You can access the history of the museum, visitor information, information about the natural wonders and cultural treasures on display as well as activities, and learning experiences offered by the museum.

Check in with the world famous Weather Lady on the Alberta Heritage website by clicking on the audio link on the right side of the page.

1 in 10 Alberta places are named after an animal and on this Alberta Heritage website on wildlife management you can listen to an audio file describing the origins of the names of places named after animals.

The Frank Slide Interpretive Centre website provides slide facts and virtual reality images.

The Alberta Government Enjoying Alberta website has information about, and images of the Leitch Collieries.

Visit the University of Lethbridge website for visuals and information about the Cypress Hills.

The Parks Canada website has an extensive collection of visuals of national parks and national historic sites, including landscapes, buildings, artifacts, and people.

Natural Resources Canada has a website featuring mountain heights and statistics that could be used for math.

Alberta Heritage has several websites describing the geographic regions and features of the province. The site about the Rocky Mountains has information on geology, landforms, climate, soils, vegetation, and animal life. It includes links to audio commentaries about the grizzly bear, ruffled grouse, bighorn sheep, cougars, and mountain goats. You can also find descriptions of Alberta's rock and mineral riches and view photographs of the Columbia Icefield and the Athabasca Glacier.

Further information about Alberta wildlife can be found at the Alberta Government's Sustainable Resource Development page. It has links to Watchable Wildlife, Bears in Alberta, Grizzly Bear Management, Status of Alberta Wildlife, and Wolves in Alberta. There is also information about Alberta's species at risk.

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CHAPTER 3: THE FOOTHILLS REGION

For use with TR lessons

Lesson 3.1

View a relief map for Elevations in Alberta on this Natural Resources Canada website.

Track precipitation and get the 5-day forecast for locations in Alberta on this Environment Canada website.

Lesson 3.2

This online encyclopaedia entry for the Woodland caribou gives a good, short description of the animal and its habitat. The site also provides related links.

Lesson 3.3

Alberta Heritage has a website describing Alberta's natural resources.

Lesson 3.4

You can access facts about agriculture in Alberta through this provincial government website.

Other related sites

There is interesting geographical and endangered species information, as well as striking photographs of the Foothills Region on this website.

Parks Canada has an extensive collection of visuals of national parks and national historic sites, including landscapes, buildings, artifacts, and people.

The Alberta Heritage page on the Foothills Region has information on the geology, landforms, climate, soils, vegetation, and animal life of the area. There is also a featured audio commentary on the mule deer.

Alberta Government's Sustainable Resource Development website has pages on endangered species; this one is specifically for the woodland caribou.

Further information about Alberta wildlife can be found at the Alberta Government's Sustainable Resource Development page. It has links to Watchable Wildlife, Bears in Alberta, Grizzly Bear Management, Status of Alberta Wildlife, and Wolves in Alberta.

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CHAPTER 4: THE GRASSLAND REGION

For use with TR lessons

Lesson 4.2

This site for Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park has information about activities, services and other useful topics.

When doing the Water Use Inquiry, visit the Water use and conservation website from the government of Alberta. It supplies interesting statistics about water use in Alberta.

Lesson 4.3

Detailed information about Alberta's endangered species can be found at this Alberta government website. There are some very detailed reports available by clicking on the links.

Lesson 4.4

Visit this website for the Glenbow Museum where you can search archived photos. Click on the links to view upcoming events and other useful museum information.

Lesson 4.4 and Activity Card 4

This is the homepage for the world-famous Calgary Stampede.

Lesson 4.5

For more in-depth information about ranching and ranchers, as well as a history of the profession, see this Alberta Heritage site.

Other related sites

This website has information about the geography and endangered species of the Grassland Region.There are also helpful links to other sites on the subject.

The Parks Canada website has an extensive collection of visuals of national parks and national historic sites, including landscapes, buildings, artifacts, and people.

Alberta Heritage has information on the geology, landforms, climate, soils, vegetation, and animal life of the Grassland Region. The site includes featured audio commentaries on the pronghorn, golden eagle, and coyote.

The Alberta Government Sustainable Resource Development website has several listings for species at risk in Alberta. See in particular the entries for the burrowing owl, and the swift fox.

The Canadian Professional Rodeo Association has information about rodeo events.

Statistics Canada has Canadian Agriculture teacher's kits which can be downloaded.

The website for the historic Cowboy Trail has an extensive listing of communities, events and visitor information as well as stories from the saddle, and images of the region.

Further information about Alberta wildlife can be found at the Alberta Government's Sustainable Resource Development page. It has links to Watchable Wildlife, Bears in Alberta, Grizzly Bear Management, Status of Alberta Wildlife, and Wolves in Alberta.

The University of Calgary has extensive background on the development of Calgary from Kootisaw to present day. View photographs and information on ranching and settlement on this website.

The Alberta Online Encyclopedia has images and a profile of Writing-on-Stone describing its importance to Aboriginal peoples.

The Collections Canada website features photographs and information about the Bar U Ranch. Heritage Trails includes stories of the daily life of cowboys and the role of Aboriginal cowboys in the development of Alberta cattle ranching.

The Alberta Heritage website has a history of the development of the Turner Valley.

Jim Cornish, a grade 5 teacher in Gander, Nfld. has prepared this document on Chinook winds. It also includes some useful activity pages.

The Alberta Community Development website provides a detailed history of the development of Turner Valley.

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CHAPTER 5: THE PARKLAND REGION

Lesson 5.1

This Canadian Heritage website for francophone communities in Alberta has a good description of francophone history, including the fur trade, as well as an overview of the culture.

The Alberta Heritage website provides a history of francophone settlement in Alberta.

L'Association canadienne-française de l'Alberta (ACFA) has information about francophone communities in Alberta. The main page features a map which is also available for purchase.

The Galileo Educational Network has local histories from all across Canada. You can view this project by students in Okotoks on this website.

Lesson 5.2

You can find information about Environment Canada's top weather stories at this site.

Lesson 5.6 (also applies to the student resource page 96, question 1)

Alberta Children's Services presents the Great Kids Award each year to reward kids who "show generosity, compassion and a strong sense of spirit."

Other related sites

Visit this website to view geographical information and photos of the Parkland Region.

The Parks Canada website has an extensive collection of visuals of national parks and national historic sites, including landscapes, buildings, artifacts, and people.

The Alberta Online Encylopedia entry for the Parkland region includes information on the geology, landforms, climate, soils, vegetation, and animal life of the area. Listen to the featured audio commentaries on shore birds, trumpeter swans, white tailed weasels, beaver, and Canada geese.

The CBC Archives has a 1990 video clip of Chief Jerome Morin stating his intention to sue the federal government over Enoch Band claims for treaty rights and oil revenues.

Further information about Alberta wildlife can be found at the Alberta government's Sustainable Resource Development page. It has links to Watchable Wildlife, Bears in Alberta, Grizzly Bear Management, Status of Alberta Wildlife, and Wolves in Alberta.

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CHAPTER 6: THE BOREAL FOREST REGION

For use with TR lessons

Lessons 6.2 and 6.6

The website for Alex Janvier features galleries where you can view his work.

Lesson 6.3

The link to 'A Kid's Tour of Historic Lac La Biche' is no longer available.

Sierra Noble is a 16 year old fiddler in the Métis tradition. You can read more about her music and her other interests on this website.

The Alberta Forest Products Association website has facts and figures about the industry in Alberta. There is also information about the association's commitment to the environment.

Lesson 6.4

The Alberta government gives a good overview of surface and mineral rights on this website.

Other related sites

You can find useful information about the Boreal Forest Region on this website which also includes photographs of the region.

The Virtual Museum of Métis History and Culture has a wealth of Métis music, oral stories, and images.

The Alberta Heritage website on the Boreal Forest features geographical information relating to geology, landforms, climate, soils, vegetation, and animal life. The site includes audio commentaries on moose, caribou, bison, and wolves.

The Kids' Site of Canadian Settlement is a Collections Canada website. This link will take you to information about Métis culture where there are instructions for making a Métis-inspired sash bracelet.

Follow this link to the Oil Sands Discovery Centre for information on educational programs at the centre.

The Parks Canada website has an extensive collection of visuals of national parks and national historic sites, including landscapes, buildings, artifacts, and people.

The Métis Matters website has present-day and historical information about Métis events and people.

This Alberta Heritage website explores reasons for the loss of wetlands.

For information about the whooping crane, one of Alberta's species at risk, visit this Sustainable Resource Development website.

The Alberta Online Encyclopedia features a page on the Métis in Alberta. It has information about the Métis people and their communities.

View this Collections Canada website for information about early agriculture in Lac La Biche.

The International Paper company offers free posters and teacher's guides about the forest.

The Society of American Foresters will provide educational resources relating to forestry on this website.

This website, developed with the help of the Canadian National Collection, has links to the Lac La Biche Mission. A history of the mission, site plans, and historical maps are also available on this site.

Further information about Alberta wildlife can be found at the Alberta Government's Sustainable Resource Development page. It has links to Watchable Wildlife, Bears in Alberta, Grizzly Bear Management, Status of Alberta Wildlife, and Wolves in Alberta.

This Alberta Heritage website provides teaching materials on the importance of Alberta's petroleum resources. Included are teaching units, stories, historical photographs, audio, and a WebQuest, which can be downloaded, showing the importance of Alberta's petroleum resources.

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CHAPTER 7: THE CANADIAN SHIELD REGION

See this website for photos and information about the geography of the Canadian Shield.

The Parks Canada website has an extensive collection of visuals of national parks and national historic sites, including landscapes, buildings, artifacts, and people.

Alberta Heritage has an informative website on the Canadian Shield which includes information on the geology, landforms, climate, soils, vegetation, and animal life of the Canadian Shield region. The page also includes links to a featured audio commentary on the pelican.

Find out more about the status of pelicans, a species at risk in Alberta, on the Sustainable Resource Development site.

View this Parks Canada website for the UNESCO world heritage site Wood Buffalo National Park.

Further information about Alberta wildlife can be found at the Alberta Government's Sustainable Resource Development page. It has links to Watchable Wildlife, Bears in Alberta, Grizzly Bear Management, Status of Alberta Wildlife, and Wolves in Alberta.

The Statistics Canada website has an Aboriginal Population Profile. You can search for the population of Fort Chipewyan from the latest census.

A history of the Mikisew Cree as well as the climate, transportation, population, and environment of Fort Chipewyan can be found on this site.

View photographs and descriptions of traditional Dene clothing at this website.

The Sky Scan Awareness project provides latitude and longitude for Alberta communities.

The website for the Canadian Rivers Heritage System has information about the geography, human and natural heritage, and recreational uses of the Athabasca River.

The main website for the regional municipality of Wood Buffalo has a link to the Winter Roads Update page (available during the winter season). The site has the latest weather conditions and travel advisories.

The Alberta Source website has photographs and information on the people of Fort Chipewyan. The Heritage Trails feature relates the history of the community.

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CHAPTER 8: THE FIRST PEOPLES

For use with TR lessons

Lesson 8.2

The website for Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump includes a virtual tour of this UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Interpretive Centre provides a good, condensed view of the area.

This site, developed by the Government of Canada to assist students in learning more about the First Nations, has PDF documents about The Learning Circle.

See the Glenbow museum website for The Story of the Blackfoot People. It has links to stories, including those related to the buffalo.

Lesson 8.6 (SR page 190, question 1b)

View a biography of Dale Auger on his website.

Biographies of James Gladstone can be found at these sites:

Saskatchewan Indian

Canadian Heritage

Heritage Community Foundation

This link to the Southern Alberta Pioneers and Their Descendants website includes James Gladstone in a list of local pioneers.

Biographies of Ralph Steinhauer can be found at these sites:

Heritage Community Foundation

Saskatchewan Indian

Canadian Encyclopedia

A short description of Tyrone Potts' career as a Mountie can be found on this website.

View this website to read a newspaper report of Thersea Gadwa's election to the role of Chief of the Kehewin Reserve.

Follow the links on Alex Janvier's homepage to read his biography.

 

Additional websites for alternative topics (for Student Resource page 190, question 1b):

There are biographies of Joseph and Josephine Crowshoe on the following sites:

Heritage Community Foundation

Indian and Northern Affairs Canada

The Heritage Community Foundation has a good kid-friendly biography of Gerald Tailfeathers.

The Calgary Board of Education prepared a special site to mark Alberta's Centennial. David Crowchild is included on the list of celebrated people. You can also read one student's version of the life of David Crowchild.

Other related sites

The Aboriginal Canada Portal provides a directory and contact information for First Nations in Alberta.

The Royal Alberta Museum homepage has links to all the goings-on at the museum.

The 2learn website has links to heritage sites and museums.

The Heritage Community Foundation website features an Alberta Heritage Alphabet.

The Regional Learning Project of the University of Montana has a page describing the culture of the Blackfoot people of Canada and the United States. The site includes visuals, stories, and audio clips.

Glenbow Museum has a page featuring stories taken from story robes. Click on different sections of the robe to learn their stories.

Information on First Nations in southern Alberta, with reference to various artifacts, can be found on this website for the Sir Alexander Galt Museum.

Information on Red River carts is available through the Clay County Historical Society.

The Alberta Heritage website provides information on archaeology and archaeological sites in Alberta.

The Aboriginal Multi-Media Society has a biography of Joseph P. Cardinal, who served two terms as chief at Saddle Lake.

The Parks Canada website has an extensive collection of visuals of national parks and national historic sites, including landscapes, buildings, artifacts, and people.

Visit this website for the Glenbow Museum to access information on using the virtual exhibit, cultural protocols, and learning resources relating to the Blackfoot culture.

The CBC Alberta Centennial website has useful background on the First Nations in Alberta.

View the Alberta Heritage site map to find links to archaeological Facts and Finds and First Nations and Métis history.

Royal Alberta Museum is a good resource for Archaeology in Alberta. The website also features an Alberta Aboriginal History Timeline.

You can find facts about the Bison Economy and early Aboriginal peoples of Alberta, lifestyles, bison hunting, the mythology of the bison. Bison timeline chronicles the exploration and settlement of Alberta at this website developed by the Applied History Research Group at the University of Calgary.

The Calgary Board of Education has an informative website. Click on For Teachers for lesson ideas on teaching traditions and culture related to Blackfoot people.

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CHAPTER 9: THE FUR TRADE

For use with TR lessons

Lesson 9.1

You can find more information about David Thompson and his explorations at this Collections Canada website.

This is a website developed to celebrate the bicentennial of David Thompson's exploration of Canada.

The Alberta Heritage Online Encylopedia has a page detailing Anthony Henday's explorations for the Hudson's Bay Company.

The Great Canadian Rivers website features exploration timelines of the North Saskatchewan River and information on explorers (Thompson, Henday, Kelsey).

Lesson 9.2

View the main page of the Festival du Voyageur to access links to information about the annual festival in Manitoba. Read about the Great-West Life School Program here.

View this Online Encyclopedia entry for more information about Métis contributions to settlement and development of Alberta.

Lesson 9.3

The Alberta Online Encylopedia has a page about the construction of Fort George and Buckingham House.

The Alberta Government website on Fort George and Buckingham House is also quite interesting.

CineFocus Canada has a good overview of the life and work of Paul Kane. 

The Parks Canada website for the Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site has a brief history of the site and useful information for planning a visit.

Lesson 9.4

View a listing of Canada's National Historic sites on the Parks Canada website.

The Alberta Government Enjoying Alberta page features information on Museums and historic sites in Alberta.

The Heritage Community Foundation has a page describing Missions in Alberta including Fort Edmonton and Rowand House.

Go to the main page of Fort Edmonton Park for details about this popular Alberta attraction.

Lesson 9.5

The Alberta Heritage website has a page describing Alberta's francophone heritage. It has stories of the fur trade, missions, and the early settlement of Alberta. It includes information about early daily life in the francophone communities of Alberta.

There is information about the origin of Alberta Place Names on this website from the Alberta Heritage Community Foundation.

Museums and historic sites in Alberta (see Lesson 9.4)

Other related sites

The Alberta-based 2Learn website has links to heritage sites and museums.

The Heritage Community Foundation website features an Alberta Heritage Alphabet.

Follow the link to the learning centre on the Hudson's Bay Company website for student activities and an interactive map showing HBC expansion. 

The Royal Alberta Museum website has a good description of the fur trade and of archaeology in Alberta. There are also Alberta stories and information about archaeological work relating to fur trading posts.

View the Great Canadian Rivers website for an exploration timeline of the North Saskatchewan River. The site also includes information on explorers (Thompson, Henday, Kelsey), and river forts from 1690 to the present.

This website has good teacher resources relating to exploration, the fur trade, and the Hudson's Bay Company.

Visit this website commemorating 'the trade' and in particular, David Thompson's contribution to exploration and the fur trade.

The Lac La Biche region website has information about David Thompson.

The Northwest Journal provides descriptions of the lives of fur traders such as Alexander Henry the Younger in Rocky Mountain House.

The Métis Museum website has information about the Métis people - their music, oral stories, and artwork. There are also archival photos and information about the Hudson's Bay Company.

The Museum of Civilization provides descriptions of the various types of fur trade canoes and a list of materials used to build them on this website.

The Parks Canada website has an extensive collection of visuals of national parks and national historic sites, including landscapes, buildings, artifacts, and people.

Visit this Alberta Source website for information about the Métis people and their contributions to the settlement and development of communities in Alberta.

This link on the Alberta Online Encyclopedia describes missions and posts, and the life of missionaries in Alberta. The site also features interactive maps showing the gradual spread and development of fur posts, Catholic missions, the NWMP, and Methodist missions. There are also timelines and a number of perspectives from individual settlers: follow the links from In Their Own Voices.

The website for Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site features a history of the Site, and descriptions of the natural wonders and cultural treasures it houses. You can also access activities and read about the learning experiences on offer.

The Collections Canada Passageways website provides background information on individual Canadian explorers.

This Alberta Heritage website describes trade and early contact between Europeans and Aboriginal peoples.

You can access biographies of explorers and missionaries on this Alberta Heritage website.

The University of Calgary documents early exploration and contact between Europeans and Aboriginal peoples on this website.

The Virtual Museum of Canada has information about Aboriginal peoples and their ways of life before the arrival of the fur traders. You can also read about the traditional arts and crafts of people in Canada's northwest.

The Alberta Online Encyclopedia has information about the fur trade and missions.

Great-West Life: Festival du Voyageur, School Program features a guide to the festival, traditional songs, activities, legends, and background information.

Information on exploration, the fur trade, and the Hudson's Bay Company can be found on this website.

The Government of Alberta website provides links to heritage sites in Alberta , including Father Lacombe Chapel, Fort George and Buckingham House, and the Victoria settlement.

The Enjoy Our Western Heritage website has links to numerous Alberta and Government of Canada websites about pioneers, the fur trade, and the gold rush. The sites also feature archival photographs of Alberta pioneer families and true stories of people who contributed to the settlement and development of Alberta communities.

More background on the history of the Métis people in Alberta as well as links to information about the Hudson's Bay Company, the North West Company, the fur trade, and fur forts in Alberta can be found at this Heritage Alberta website.

Information on the Francophone in Alberta can be found at the Alberta Heritage Foundation website. The site includes a teacher section with background information and lessons. Follow the Elementary link to the Elementary Student Zone.

The Hudson's Bay Company Learning Centre explains how teachers can receive, free of charge, Adventurers - Hudson's Bay Company - The Epic Story, written for students.

The Heritage Foundation website on Origin and Settlement features a Student Zone with stories and legends, biographies, photos, and puzzles related to Aboriginal and Métis contributions to Alberta.

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CHAPTER 10: EARLY SETTLEMENT

For use with TR lessons

Lesson 10.1

The Enjoying Alberta website, produced by the Alberta Government, has information about the Victoria Settlement.

Lesson 10.4

The homepage for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police has a good overview of the history of the organization.

You can read a first-hand account of the March West in the diary of Commissioner George French on the RCMP website.

Lesson 10.6

Francophone communities:

Alberta Heritage and Alberta's Heritage Community Foundation have information about Alberta 's francophone community.

Other related sites

The website 2learn has links to heritage sites and museums.

The Heritage Community Foundation website features an Alberta Heritage Alphabet.

The Collections Canada Confederation for Kids website includes a site for teachers.

The 'Enjoying Alberta' website has a page with information about, and images of the Father Lacombe Chapel. You can also find out about school programs on this site.

The Parks Canada website has an extensive collection of visuals of national parks and national historic sites, including landscapes, buildings, artifacts, and people.

This link on the Alberta Online Encyclopedia describes missions and posts, and the life of missionaries in Alberta . The site also features interactive maps showing the gradual spread and development of fur posts, Catholic missions, the NWMP, and Methodist missions. There are also timelines and a number of perspectives from individual settlers: follow the links from In Their Own Voices.

Visit the website How the West was Young for information on the opening and settlement of the west and the North-West Territories and for descriptions of rural life, ranching, and farming.

The Alberta Heritage website has information about the fur trade, Métis settlement, and missions.

Read about Father Albert Lacombe's contributions to the francophone community in Alberta on this website.

The Alberta Source website has a description of the life of Father Lacombe and his participation in the settlement of Alberta.

This Canadian Heritage website has information about Alberta's francophone heritage, including its missions. You can also read about the origins of French place names in Alberta on this website.

Further information about francophone and Métis settlement in Alberta can be found on the Alberta Heritage website. See also the Heritage Trails feature to read and listen to stories of communities and settlement.

For an early history of Lac La Biche visit the website for the Virtual Museum of Métis History.

This Alberta Heritage page provides a history of the francophone community in Alberta , in particular, that of St. Vincent and St. Paul The site describes the fur trade, missions, settlement, and the work of Father Lacombe.

Download a useful brochure on Métis Heritage on this website.

Collections Canada features a history of Lac La Biche describing contributions of religious communities such as the Oblates and Grey Nuns, and daily life at the mission.

Photographs and information about the Carleton Trail can be found at this website.

The University of Calgary provides photographs of NWMP officers and information about their contribution to the settlement of Alberta on this website.

Alberta Heritage has a People of Alberta page that explains Canada's settlement policy. View Sir Clifford Sifton's 1922 article from Maclean's magazine "Only Farmers Need Apply" on the subject.

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CHAPTER 11: FROM TERRITORY TO PROVINCE

For use with TR lessons

Lesson 11.1

Read the details about the naming policy for the city of Edmonton, issued by the municipal government (this link goes directly to an Adobe file).

Lesson 11.3

The building of the railway is described on 'The Adventure Train' on this kid-friendly Virtual Museum site.

Collections Canada's Kids' Site has a description of the life of Father Lacombe.

Canada by Train, on the Collections Canada website features recordings of train sounds, travelogues, posters and other train memorabilia.

Lesson 11.4

You can listen to a recording of "God Save the Queen" by clicking on the link on this page.

Government of Canada 's Confederation for Kids site offers information and some fun activities.

Lesson 11.6

'Confederation for Kids' has a page with a biography of Louis Riel.

The Collections Canada Kids' Site of Canadian Trains has a page about the Northwest Rebellion and includes a photo of Issapoomahksikaa (Crowfoot).

Read a short biography of Crowfoot on this University of Calgary website.

See this Alberta Heritage site for more information about Crowfoot.

The following websites can provide for background on the life and contributions of many of Alberta 's early settlers.

Father Lacombe:

2learn

University of Calgary

Father Vegreville:

On this Alberta Heritage website, scroll down to "French Oblate Names, Part Two: Father Vegreville" to read or listen to selections about his life.

John Ware:

Enjoying Alberta

Galileo Educational Network Association

Library and Archives Canada

Alexander Rutherford:

Alberta Heritage

Alberta Legislative Assembly

Princess Louise:

Alberta Legislative Assembly

Alberta Centennial website.

 

Other related sites

The Alberta-based 2learn website has links to heritage sites and museums.

The Heritage Community Foundation website features an Alberta Heritage Alphabet.

View the website for the Museum of Civilization to see posters that were distributed throughout Europe, Britain and the US during "The Last Best West" Advertisement Campaign (1870-1930).

The Alberta Source website displays stories celebrating Alberta's Italian community.

This Collections Canada website provides links to pages describing the ethnic diversity of southern Alberta.

Collections Canada has a description of Alberta in post-Confederation times.

Visit the CPR Heritage Site for information and photos about railway history.

Go to the University of Calgary website to view information about the history and experiences of Chinese Canadians in Alberta.

View the Alberta Heritage Site map for links to information and stories about settlement by various cultural groups as well as biographies of Adventurous Albertans. The site also provides links to information about ranching and homesteading in Alberta. See in particular the Heritage Trails feature for text and audio stories.

The Parks Canada website has an extensive collection of visuals of national parks and national historic sites, including landscapes, buildings, artifacts, and people.

You can read short biographies of southern Alberta pioneers on this website.

This link on the Alberta Online Encyclopedia describes missions and posts, and the life of missionaries in Alberta. The site also features interactive maps showing the gradual spread and development of fur posts, Catholic missions, the NWMP, and Methodist missions. There are also timelines and a number of perspectives from individual settlers: follow the links from In Their Own Voices.

The informative Parks Canada website for Bar U Ranch National Historic Site describes the history, natural wonders, and cultural treasures of the area. There are links to activities and learning experiences on offer at the Site.

Alberta Heritage has historical information related to ranching in Alberta.

Alberta Heritage describes the francophone settlement of Alberta.

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CHAPTER 12: GROWTH AND CHANGE

For use with TR lessons

Lesson 12.1

Find out about francophone schools in Alberta on this Alberta Education website.

Lesson 12.2

For a history of the Eaton's catalogue visit this Collections Canada website.

Lesson 12.3

The CBC Archives has video and audio footage of Canadian War Brides.

Lesson 12.5

Visit the Ukrainian Heritage Cultural Village website for more information about this settlement in east central Alberta.

Other related sites

Digital Collections has stories of Métis and First Nations. Follow the storytellers' links to video and audio versions of their stories.

The Enjoy Western Heritage website has links to heritage sites and museums.

The Heritage Community Foundation website features an Alberta Heritage Alphabet.

The Lac La Biche region website has information about the history of Plamondon.

View the website for the Museum of Civilization to see posters that were distributed throughout Europe, Britain and the US during 'The Last Best West' Advertisement Campaign (1870-1930).

The Virtual Museum of Canada has activities and lessons using mail-order catalogues as source materials.

The Alberta Source website displays stories celebrating Alberta's Italian community.

The Collections Canada website for the Sir Alexander Galt Museum features exhibits and content relating to diversity.

Galileo Educational Network -What stories do we have to tell? Students at the Prince of Wales Elementary School share their inquiry.

Go to this Collections Canada website to listen to music from the early days of Canadian recorded sound. Educational resources are also available. This is a good resource for Canadian folk music.

This Collections Canada website has information about Alberta and Confederation.

Read previous issues of Otipemisiwak, the journal published by the Métis Nation of Alberta.

The CBC Archives has an interesting collection of recordings about the 1930s (e.g., James Gray's recorded audio interview about driving through clouds of grasshoppers in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, and meeting a family that recycled every drop of water).

View the Alberta Heritage Site map for links to information and stories about settlement by various cultural groups as well as biographies of Adventurous Albertans. The site also provides links to information about ranching and homesteading in Alberta. See in particular the Heritage Trails feature for text and audio stories.

The Parks Canada website has an extensive collection of visuals of national parks and national historic sites, including landscapes, buildings, artifacts, and people.

The Alberta Education provides links to information about francophone schools.

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CHAPTER 13: TODAY AND TOMORROW

Lesson 13.2

Take a tour of the Alberta Centennial time capsule on this site.

Other related sites

Read previous issues of Otipemisiwak, the journal published by the Métis Nation of Alberta.

Citizenship and Immigration Canada can provide information on Canada's refugee system, as well as information about immigrating to Canada.

This website describes the lives of some of The Great Names of the French Canadian Community.

There are depictions of emblems of Alberta and the stories of their origins on this link.

For information and statistics about the francophone community in Alberta see the Atlas de la Francophonie.

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Appendices   

Appendix 6

Directory and contact information for all First Nations in Alberta can be viewed on this website.

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